SSC BDSM

ssc bdsmBasic principles of BDSM: Safe, sane, consensual

Many of those who have ever come into contact with the fetish environment came across the SSC BDSM abbreviation, which stands for safe, sane, consensual. Almost any area in the BDSM can be considered a "high-risk zone", and therefore it is so important to identify these three concepts, elevated to the rank of basic principles. It is in their maximally detailed explanation that lies the key to understanding the problems most often encountered in the communication of Thematic people. Such problems, for example, include the visual similarity of BDSM with other manifestations of one person’s power over another, violence, cruelty, etc. In addition, these three concepts cover those “risk areas” in relationships in which tensions and misunderstandings can most often occur between the top and the bottom, between an individual connected with BDSM and the community. This can be physical damage, emotional or psychological trauma, loss of trust, accidental breach of confidentiality, and much more. That is why beginners need to first know what SSC means in BDSM.

safe bdsm

Safe BDSM

Given the fact that it is impossible to make BDSM absolutely safe, we are talking about safety, implying the preservation of life and health and minimizing the possibility of irreversible effects on a person. However, quite often, both in reasoning and in practice, two points are kept silent or are overlooked: BDSM SSC is not only about physical safety, i.e. maintaining the safety and functionality of the human body, but also, to no lesser extent, the preservation of psychological health. If at least some attention is paid to safety during sessions, then safety outside sessions is almost always forgotten.

The difference between safe and unsafe directly depends not only on what partners do, but also on individual characteristics (physique, anatomy and physiology, tastes, training level, experience, atmosphere, emotional state, phobias, reactions to stressful and critical situations, etc.), and even on the quality of the devices used. There are more risky forms of BDSM, just as there are less, and you need to understand that there will always be people who want to practice the most dangerous forms of BDSM. In any case, the main task will be to reduce the risk to an acceptable minimum for partners, both during the session and after it. You should remember the presence of seeming, compared with the main action, "little things", and do not forget about the special aftercare.

Often during a session, the top (or the bottom) begins to think, “it could be done stronger” and increase (ask to increase) efforts. This should not be done during the first joint session; as well as if the chosen device is used for the first time. Of course, the experience can significantly change the situation. So, an experienced top, who knows his bottom, can increase the intensity and the bottom - knowing the limits of her own body - ask, for example, for more flogging or beating with whip or paddle. Besides, experience in one area of BDSM does not increase safety in others, and experience in the field of physical impact does not provide automatic experience in ensuring psychological safety.

consensual bdsm

Consensual BDSM

Consensual is also far from being such an unambiguously defined concept, as it might seem. With the consent of a partner, you can do a lot, even risky, and without consent, the most innocent game can be an injury or even a crime. Contrary to popular belief, the presence and even observance of safe words do not guarantee voluntariness in any way, since the situation can be built in such a way that the bottom will not be able to give a stop signal, or, under the influence of the situation, will agree to what she did not want to agree earlier and what will regret afterward. Also, consensual implies "not being forced", and "mindfulness of decision." Simply put, a person must give consent without any pressure, and knowing what she is agreeing to. Therefore, in contrast to the more traditional forms of close contact between people, in BDSM a preliminary clarification of the limitations and obtaining direct voluntary consent to some actions is a necessity. And when you research something new and break down old barriers, it is especially necessary to be sure that both partners, in the same understanding of BDSM rule of SSC.

sane bdsm

Sane BDSM

If the principle of consensual suggests using safe words and stipulating conditions, the principle of safe is to improve your skills and knowledge, then sane does not offer anything concrete and is often considered not as a separate principle, but as an integral part of safety - in the form of warnings from BDSM sessions under the influence of alcohol or from contacts with people who are emotionally challenged. However, if we proceed from the initial tasks in order not to violate ethical and/or moral taboos, to make BDSM practice pleasant for each other, etc., it is the principle of sane that dictates the need for compliance with safety and voluntariness. Thus, it is hardly possible to unambiguously determine which of the principles is more important or "was the first", they are too interconnected for this. Everyone wants what he/she does to be either pleasant or useful. Therefore, if the practice of BDSM harms the health or condition of a person it is worth considering if it is reasonable to continue it, although this can be both safe and voluntary. The principle of sane comes to the fore even in the case when there is a desire to do something unsafe. Sometimes the degree of risk, even with the proper ensuring of all conceivable security measures, is too great to decide on this action.